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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 5  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 9-14

Myths regarding oral health among patients visiting a dental school in North India: A cross-sectional survey


1 Department of Public Health Dentistry, Rayat and Bahra Dental College and Hospital, Mohali, Punjab, India
2 Department of Periodontics, Laxmi Bai Institute of Dental Sciences and Hospital, Patiala, Punjab, India
3 Department of Periodontics, Rayat and Bahra Dental College and Hospital, Mohali, Punjab, India
4 Department of Public Health Dentistry, MM University, Mullana, Ambala, Haryana, India

Correspondence Address:
Ramandeep Singh Gambhir
Department of Public Health Dentistry, Rayat and Bahra Dental College and Hospital, Mohali - 140 104, Punjab
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2231-6027.171158

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Background: In the field of dentistry, various myths and misconceptions prevail among patients that hamper them from availing proper treatment from a dental professional. Therefore, this study was conducted to assess the prevalence of myths regarding oral health and hygiene among out-patients visiting a dental school in North India and suggest possible remedial measures. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted utilizing a convenience sample of 552 participants. A self-designed pretested questionnaire containing 15 questions on myths regarding oral health and hygiene was distributed among the study participants. Demographic details of the subjects were also recorded. Results were statistically analyzed using Chi-square test. Results: More than half (58.7%) of the participants thought that there is a worm inside a decayed tooth, and this was significantly associated with age, gender, and educational status of participants. Three-fourth (75%) of the participants were of the opinion that decay is caused by eating sweets, and more than 70% of males believed this and this was significantly associated with age and educational status of study participants (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Myths and misconceptions regarding oral health prevailed among majority of the participants in this study. There is an urgent need to educate the public regarding various oral health issues.


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