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 Table of Contents  
REVIEW ARTICLE
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 9  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 64-66

A literature review on the satisfaction of oral health care and health care professionals in dental colleges in India


Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, BJS Dental College and Research Institute, Ludhiana, Punjab, India

Date of Submission04-Jan-2019
Date of Acceptance27-Jul-2019
Date of Web Publication13-Nov-2019

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Paramjot Kaur
Department Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Baba Jaswant Singh Dental College Hospital and Research Institute, Sector 40, Chandigarh Road, Ludhiana - 141 010, Punjab
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijohs.ijohs_1_19

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  Abstract 


This literature review was aimed to assess the quality of oral health care provided by dental professionals and the satisfaction of dental undergraduates, graduates, and postgraduates in their profession. Most of the dental students and graduate staff members are satisfied in their profession and are interested in pursuing masters in dental surgery. A significant number of dental professionals are satisfied in their profession. Their main cause of dissatisfaction was low salary. Main causes of satisfaction on standards of oral health care were found to be willingness to listen to dental problems and cleanliness of the treatment area. The main cause of dissatisfaction was significantly slow management of dental problems.

Keywords: Dental education, dental profession satisfaction, Indian health care, review dental health, review dental salary


How to cite this article:
Kaur P. A literature review on the satisfaction of oral health care and health care professionals in dental colleges in India. Int J Oral Health Sci 2019;9:64-6

How to cite this URL:
Kaur P. A literature review on the satisfaction of oral health care and health care professionals in dental colleges in India. Int J Oral Health Sci [serial online] 2019 [cited 2019 Dec 15];9:64-6. Available from: http://www.ijohsjournal.org/text.asp?2019/9/2/64/270873




  Introduction Top


A review of cross-sectional surveys was done to assess the quality of oral health care provided by dental professionals and to assess the satisfaction of dental undergraduates, graduates, and postgraduates in their profession.

The European Society of Radiology (ESR) and the ESR Subcommittee on Audit and Standards defined internal audits as “Where the objectives of audits are to be decided by the management of the department.” Further, though methodologies such as interviews and statistics may be involved, the results are unique to that particular setting.[1]

With the increase in a number of dental institutes and awareness of patients toward dental health and education, regular surveys on the quality of dental health care provided in dental institutes will improve the attitude of dental surgeons in managing their patients and toward their profession.

Thomas et al.[2] in their survey on mobile dental service reported that 86.7% of patients expressed complete satisfaction with the dentist's willingness to listen, 71.1% of patients were not satisfied with the long waiting times for treatment at the camps, and 96% of the service providers said that segregation of biomedical waste was an area of concern in the mobile clinic. One of the salient findings of the study was that most of the other employees of the institute were completely satisfied with the willingness of the service providers to listen to their problems. Barnes found that the dentist's willingness to talk and listen to patients is an important criterion for effective communication.[3]

Kalra et al.[4] in their study on the assessment of job satisfaction among dental educators showed that the overall job satisfaction was 62.76%, however the least satisfying aspect being salary and reasonable level of financial security. Similar to our study, their analysis could not show significant associations between levels of job satisfaction and variables such as gender, age, academic post, marital status, administrative responsibility in job, years of experience in the profession, and vacations per year.

Most of the students and graduates associated with academic institutes are interested in settling in India and pursue their masters in dental surgery. Furthermore, most of them are interested in doing their private clinical practice in India. The remaining doctors are interested to settle abroad. Few of them opt for changing their profession. most of the postgraduates were found to be satisfied in India and a few of them wanted to settle abroad. Jain and Agarwal[5] in their study reported that dentistry is one of the highest-paid profession in developed countries, but the situation is not the same in India. Opportunities for dental graduates are limited. Jobs in government sector are few. With each new hospital opening, it creates only 1–2 jobs for dentists as compared to many jobs for medical graduates. Salary in private hospitals is also less. Most private hospitals and clinics will offer a dental fresher a meager amount of less than INR 10,000–15,000 (USD 200–300) per month for a full-time job. Private practice of dentistry is more fruitful than being attached to the dental hospitals. Working at dental hospitals provides fixed income with slower annual growth compared to the private practice. Hence, private practice is the dream of every dental graduate. However, the investment for establishing a competent dental clinic is higher than general health clinic due to expensive equipment.[5]

A survey of dental students graduating in Gandhi Dental College and Hospital, Bhubaneswar, has shown that around 40% of students in the 1st year of graduation were interested in pursuing postgraduation. Increasing trend toward postgraduation was observed with the seniority, and almost 70% of students from the 4th year of graduation have voted for master degree.[6] The number of seats available for MDS is only around 3000 compared to each year passed outs of 25,000 BDS students. This is a big bottleneck in career prospects of a dentist. Many of young graduates after failure to get admission in MDS seats feel confused. They then try to search other alternatives for career growth. Some look for overseas where after an initial period of struggle, the opportunities and returns are better. Countries like USA, UK, and Australia are popular destinations for dental graduates. An increasing number of dentists are now moving to places like Russia, Romania, and Germany for higher education. Most of these countries will require clearing a licensing examination and few years of study. Therefore, initially, the person will need to support himself. Courses such as public health, healthcare management, clinical research, and administrative services are becoming popular with dental graduates. If done from good institutes, better opportunities await them in the corporate health care and pharmaceutical companies. Some dental graduates consider working at knowledge process outsourcing units, while other move to insurance sector. Once absorbed, they need to compete with the people of various nonmedical undergraduate streams and there dental education becomes redundant.[5]

Despite the role of private sector in the growth of Indian dental education, there are certain issues regarding quality of education provided by private dental colleges. Unfortunately, many of the colleges have less than adequate infrastructure. There is evidence that many dental colleges are short of staff. Faculty members in many dental colleges are engaged in private practice with comparatively less time to devote to teaching. Another concern is the 5th year of undergraduate training, which is not effectively implemented. Many private dental schools encourage students to complete their internship at another institution (generally in their own home state or town) to save the parent college from the burden of training students for another year. This may well result in less than adequate practical training for students. Often, students in private colleges lack the necessary clinical exposure and hence are not properly trained.[5]

The Indian health-care industry is growing very fast owing to the increasing demand for quality health care. However, even in such situation, the condition of dental graduates is not improving. Factors such as nonuniformity of admission procedure, uneven distribution of dental colleges across India, decreased quality of education and hurdles to establish a private practice, difficulty in getting postgraduation, and financial security are some of the reasons that play the main role in such crisis. Although all of these factors cannot be eliminated immediately, the Dental Council of India (DCI) and the Government of India should take steps to retain the interest of dental graduates within the dental stream. If appropriate decisions are not made on time, it will negatively affect the integrity of the dental profession, and highly trained dental task force of the country will go in vain.[7]


  Initiative of the Government of India for Dental Profession Top


Hendricson in their study on “It all starts with questions” reported the need for more initiatives from the Government of India for dental graduates. The present situation of dental graduates is critical and requires radical decisions to be taken.[7]


  Initiative of the Dental Council of India for Dental Profession Top


Jain and Agarwal reported that DCI is working on improving the quality of dental colleges. The council has now made it mandatory for professors teaching in undergraduate level to stay in the same college for at least 1 year. Such decisions by the council can help in upgrading the quality of the dental education in India.[5]


  Initiative of Dental Institute and Its Alumni Top


The author of this present literature review has experience of working in dental institutes in India with 100% admission. A good number of graduates are running their successful clinical practice, have attained masters in India, and have licensure to work abroad. A few of these graduates have changed their profession into other fields that also include forensic, legal, police, taxation, other administrative services in various sectors of public health and even disaster management, etc., Although some have changed their profession, most of the alumni carry their skills, abilities, virtues, and vision to bring a progressive change in dental profession as well.

Extensive continuing education efforts and campaigns to disseminate best practice guidelines by the institute will definitely play a vital role in substantially altering practice behaviors in the future years.[7] To revamp the level of health care services provided in India and to oblige the good work and vision of conscientious dental professionals in India, whether one ultimately feels satisfied is a personal choice.[8]


  Future Prospects Top


This study shows an essentiality for the assessment of patients about their satisfaction to improve services provided to them in various departments in the dental institute and need to conduct periodical and clinical audits as well to gain further insight for the improvement of the satisfaction levels of dental students and professionals.

Limitation of our study

Although in this literature review a few of the dental graduates wanted to change their profession, changes required in dental profession and dental education particularly in India were not assessed. Our survey also could not show significant associations between the levels of job satisfaction and variables such as gender, age, academic post, marital status, administrative responsibility in job, years of experience in the profession, and vacations per year.


  Conclusion Top


Most of the dental students and graduate staff members are satisfied in their profession and are interested in pursuing masters in dental surgery. A significant number of dental professionals are satisfied in their profession. Their main cause of dissatisfaction was low salary. In this review of literature on quality of dental health care provided in dental colleges, it was found that main causes of satisfaction on standards of oral health care included willingness to listen to dental problems and cleanliness of the treatment area. The main cause of dissatisfaction was significantly slow management of dental problems.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Malleshi SN, Joshi M, Nair SK, Ashraf I. Clinical audit in dentistry: From a concept to an initiation. Dent Res J (Isfahan) 2012;9:665-70.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Thomas BA, Ranganathan RA, Jacob ME, Mann NC, Mathew GC, Samuel CL. A community participatory model of mobile dental service-survey among stakeholders. CHRISMED J Health Res 2015;2:32-7.  Back to cited text no. 2
  [Full text]  
3.
Barnes NG. Open wide: An examination of how patients select and evaluate their dentist. Health Mark Q 1985;3:49-56.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Kalra D, Kalra R, Kini PV Jathanna VR, Prashant GM. Assessment of job satisfaction among dental educators in a dental college at Davangere city, Karnataka: A cross-sectional questionnaire based study. Indian J Public Health Res Dev 2015;6:220-5.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Jain H, Agarwal A. Current scenario and crisis facing dental college graduates in India. J Clin Diagn Res 2012;3824:1892.  Back to cited text no. 5
    
6.
Garla BK. Career aspirations and reasons for choosing dentistry as a career – A survey of dental students in Gandhi Dental college and hospital, Bhubaneswar. Ann Essence Dent 2011;3:108-10.  Back to cited text no. 6
    
7.
Hendricson B. It all starts with questions. J Dent Educ 2003;67:965-9.  Back to cited text no. 7
    
8.
Andrade NN. Let's learn to self-introspect. Natl J Maxillofac Surg 2013;4:1.  Back to cited text no. 8
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   Abstract
  Introduction
   Initiative of th...
   Initiative of th...
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  Future Prospects
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